Celebrating 40 years of Volunteers

Celebrating 40 years of Volunteers

Tomorrow, Multiples NZ will host it’s 40th Annual General Meeting.

The intention had been to celebrate this 40th birthday in Christchurch as part of the annual Multiples NZ National Training Forum. Sadly, Covid-19’s arrival meant that this event had to be cancelled and now, for the first time ever, our AGM will be held virtually.

Forty years ago, in Palmerston North, a group of likeminded parents of multiples gathered together and determined that a national organisation was needed, to ensure that other whānau with multiples received the care and support they needed. Since then this organisation has put in the hard mahi to achieve that purpose.

Over 40 years, this organisation has been supported by many, many hardworking volunteers, and we want to make sure that those people are acknowledged. We have done our best to list everyone who volunteered for the national organisation. To collate all these names, we have scrolled through forty years of minutes, starting with paper and typewriter ink, through to printed paper from a computer and finally virtually as a PDF. Check out photos of previous AGMs and National Conferences here –

Ehara taku toa i te toa takitahi, engari he toa takitini

‘My strength is not that of a single warrior but that of many.’

The names listed here are only a small representation of all the amazing people who have supported whānau through local Multiples Clubs, some of which have been in place for over 50 years.

1980/81 Angela Bailey, Triplets Plus

Margaret Lash, Rotorua

Thora Young, Manawatu

Margaret Tait, Levin

Frances Gray, Wainuiomata

Lee Thorburn, Greymouth

Trevor Miller, Otago

Lyn Ellis, Christchurch

1981/82 Anne Barr, President

Debbie Walton, Secretary

Jessie Johnston, Vice President

Irene Remnant, Treasurer

Judy McCorkindale, International Liaison

1982/83 Anne Barr, President

Debbie Walton, Secretary

Jessie Johnston, Vice President

Irene Remnant, Treasurer

Judy McCorkindale, International Liaison

1983/84 Joy Brown, President

Shirley-Anne Collins, Vice-President

Liz Barron, Secretary

Alice Hedgeman, Treasurer

Judy McCorkindale, Overseas Liaison

Research, Anne Barr

Newsletter, Waikato

Consumer Affairs, Shirley-Anne Collins

Publications, Debbie Walton

Library, Betty McDonald

Register, Joy Brown

1984/85 Joy Brown, President

Shirley-Anne Collins, Vice-President

Liz Barron, Secretary

Phillipa Third, Treasurer

Judy McCorkindale, Overseas Liaison

Research, Anne Barr

Newsletter, North Shore

Consumer Affairs, Rotorua

Publications, Debbie Walton

Library, Betty McDonald

Register, Joy Brown

1985/86 Joy Brown, President

Keith Jones, Vice-President

Phillipa Third, Secretary

Liz Barron, Treasurer

Wellington Club, Overseas Liaison

Research, Anne Barr

Newsletter, A Doles, S Coster

Consumer Affairs, vacant

Publications, Waikato

Library, R Jacobs

Register, Joy Brown

Publications, Pen, Spoon, S A Collins

1986/87 Liz Barron, President

Warrick Rodgers, Vice-President

Jill Doms, Secretary

Colin Hamilton, Treasurer

Carol Stigly, Overseas Liaison

Research, Anne Barr

Newsletter, Stephanie Coster, Allison Doell

Consumer Affairs, vacant

Publications, Virginia Lundin, Debbie Walton

Library, Judy Hunter

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • Upper North Island, Anne Barr
  • Lower North Island, Gillian Ilott
  • South Island, Wayne Barr
1987/88 Gillian Berridge, President

Joy Brown, Vice-President

Gill Doms, Secretary

Colin Hamilton, Treasurer

Carol Stigley, Overseas Liaison

Research, Anne Barr

Newsletter,Jackie Gibb, Wendy Thomson

Consumer Affairs,

Publications, Margaret Spence

Library, Joy Brown

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • Upper North Island, Anne Barr
  • Lower North Island, Kirsteen Buckingham
  • Upper South Island, Hilda Philpott
  • Lower South Island, Sue McPherson
1988/89 Gillian Berridge, President

Gary van der Werff, Vice-President

Carla Wild, Secretary

Colin Hamilton, Treasurer

Megan Holland, Overseas Liaison

Research, Joy Brown

Newsletter,Sue Lambie

Consumer Affairs,

Resources, Margaret Spence

Library, –

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Lyn Jelicich
  • Central North Island, Jan Cate
  • Lower North Island, Helen Carter
  • East Coast North Island, Anne Corney
  • North South Island, Hilda Philpott
  • South South Island, Sue McPherson
1989/90 Joy Brown, President

Hilda Philpot, Vice-President

Carla Wild, Secretary

Hilary Dineen, Treasurer

Meagan Holland, Overseas Liaison

Research, Meagan Holland

Newsletter,Hamilton Club

Consumer Affairs,

Resources, Gillian Berridge

Resource Officer, Anne Hodges

Library,

Register, Joy Brown

Special Projects, Rick Hopkinson

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Rachel Donegan
  • Central North Island, Gary van der Werff
  • Lower North Island, Audrey Guirdham
  • East Coast North Island  Anne Corney
  • North South Island, Pam Clark and Raewyn Derbridge
  • South South Island, Sue Lambie
1990/91 Joy Brown, President

Hilda Philpot, Vice-President

Carla Wild, Secretary

Hilary Dineen, Treasurer

Meagan Holland, Overseas Liaison

Research, Meagan Holland

Newsletter,Hamilton Club

Consumer Affairs,

Resources, Anne Corney

Publications,Gillian Berridge

Library,

Register, Joy Brown

Special Projects, Rick Hopkinson

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island Rachel Donegan
  • Central North Island, Gary van der Werff
  • Lower North Island, Anne Corney
  • North South Island, Pam Clark and Raewyn Derbridge
  • South South Island, Sue Lambie
1991/92 Bridget Car, President

Vicki Campion, Vice-President

Heather Newton, Secretary

Hilary Dineen, Treasurer

Carla Wild, Overseas Liaison

Research,

Newsletter/Publications,Hamilton Club

Consumer Affairs,

Resources, Alaine Shaw

Publications,

Library,

Register, Joy Brown

Special Projects, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Audrey Guirdham
  • Central North Island, Kirsten Ward, Anne Marie Collins, Gael McKay
  • East Coast North Island Margaret Fromont
  • Lower North Island Janine Arcus
  • North South Island, Vicki Campion
  • Middle South Island, June Macdonald
  • South South Island, Raewyn Alexander
1992/93 Bridget Car, President

Vicki Campion, Vice-President

Anne Corney, Secretary

Carla Wild, Treasurer

Julie White, Overseas Liaison

Research,

Newsletter, Karen Dalgleish

Publications, Alaine Shaw

Consumer Affairs,

Resources, Julie White

Library, –

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island –
  • Central North Island, Kirsten Ward, Robyn Ryan, Gael McKay
  • East Coast North Island, Margaret Fromont
  • Lower North Island, Raewyn Blomfield
  • North South Island, Vicki Campion
  • Central South Island, Sharyn Woodhouse
  • South South Island, Raewyn Alexander
1993/94 Bridget Car, President

  • , Vice-President

Raewyn Alexander, Secretary

Carla Wild, Treasurer

Julie White, Overseas Liaison

Research,

Newsletter, Karen Dalgleish

Publications, Alaine Shaw

Consumer Affairs,

Resources, Julie White

Library, –

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island –
  • Central North Island, Christine Payze, Robyn Ryan
  • East Coast North Island, Jane Wilson
  • South North Island, –
  • North South Island, Vicki Campion
  • Central South Island, June McDonald
  • South South Island, Judy Brown
1994/95 Karin Dalgliesh, President

  • , Vice-President

Raewyn Alexander, Secretary

Carla Wild, Treasurer

Cathy Bird, Overseas Liaison

Research,

Newsletter, Margaret Fromont and Hawkes Bay Club

Publications, Bridget Carr

Consumer Affairs,

Resources, Cathy Bird

Library,

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, –
  • Central North Island, Helen Hudson
  • East Coast North Island, Jane Wilson
  • South North Island, Margot Ferrick
  • North South Island, –
  • Central South Island, –
  • South South Island, Southland Multiple Birth Club ℅ Judy Brown
1995/96 Karin Dalgliesh, President

  • , Vice-President

Raewyn Alexander, Secretary

Liz Blake, Treasurer

1996/97 Raewyn Alexander, President

  • , Vice-President

Raewyn Alexander, Secretary

Liz Blake, Treasurer

Stephanie Gartrell, Overseas Liaison

Research,

Newsletter, Vikki Pflaum

Publications, Carla Wild, Karin Dalgleish

Consumer Affairs,

Resources, Stephanie Gartrell

Library,

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Alison Gardinier, Anthea Springford
  • Central North Island, Julia Price
  • East Coast North Island, Michelle Payne
  • South North Island, –
  • North South Island, -Carol Parkinson
  • Central South Island, Christchurch Club
  • South South Island, Dawn Montagne-Maley, Celeste Palmer
1997/98 Liz Blake, President

Joy Brown, Secretary

Anthea Springfield, Treasurer

Stephanie Gartrell, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, Vikki Pflaum

Publications, Julie Price

Funding Officer, Celeste Palmer

Resources, Stephanie Gartrell

Library,

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Alison Gardinier
  • Central North Island, Michelle Payne
  • East Coast North Island, –
  • South North Island, – Julia Price
  • North South Island, – Carol Parkinson
  • Central South Island, Christchurch Club
  • South South Island, Dawn Montagne-Maley, Celeste Palmer
1998/99 Liz Blake, President

Stephanie Gartrell, Vice-President

Joy Brown, Secretary

Gillian McPeake, Treasurer

Dawn Montagne-Maley, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, –

Publications, Julie Price

Funding Officer, Celeste Palmer

Resources, Dawn Montagne-Maley

Library,

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, –
  • Central North Island, Hamilton Club
  • East Coast North Island, –
  • South North Island, – Wendy Eyles
  • North South Island, – Carol Parkinson
  • Central South Island, Christchurch Club
  • South South Island, Celeste Palmer
1999/00 Celeste Palmer, President

Gladys Billing, Vice-President

Joy Brown, Secretary

Gillian McPeake, Treasurer

Dawn Montagne-Maley, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, Gladys Billing

Publications, Stephanie Gartrell

Funding Officer, Celeste Palmer

Resources, Dawn Montagne-Maley

Library,

Register, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Auckland Central
  • Central North Island, Hamilton Club
  • East Coast North Island, Hawkes Bay Club
  • South North Island, – Wendy Eyles
  • North South Island, – Nelson Club
  • Central South Island, Carol McHaffie
  • South South Island, Gail Shanks
2000/01 Gladys Billing, President

Wendy Eyles, Vice-President

Gillian Dibley, Secretary

Gillian McPeake, Treasurer

Celeste Palmer, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, –

Publications, –

Funding Officer, Celeste Palmer

Resources, Celeste Palmer

Library,

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, –
  • Central North Island, Hamilton Club
  • East Coast North Island, Hawkes Bay Club
  • South North Island, Ciska Penlington
  • North South Island, Diana Franklin
  • Central South Island, Wayne Treymane
  • South South Island, –
2001/02 Gladys Billing, President

Wendy Eyles, Vice-President

Gillian Dibley, Secretary

Ann ter Steege, Treasurer

Shelley North, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, –

Publications, –

Funding Officer, –

Resources, Shelley North

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Website, Geraldine Bruin

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Michelle Mann
  • West Central North Island, Shelley North
  • East Coast North Island, Hawkes Bay Club
  • South North Island, –
  • North South Island, Melissa Williams
  • Central South Island, Carol McHaffie
  • Otago, Raewyn Alexander
  • Southland, Joy Brown
2002/03 Wendy Eyles, President

Gillian Dibley, Vice-President

Michelle Mann, Secretary

Natasha Melcalfe, Treasurer

Verity Lockley, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, Le’Anne Cox

Publications, –

Funding Officer, Sue Newton

Resources, Gladys Billing

Register, Leigh Kenney

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Website, Geraldine Bruin

Research, Joy Brown

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Waitakere Club
  • West Central North Island, Shelley North
  • East Central North Island, Carolyn McLachlan
  • East Coast North Island, Hawkes Bay Club
  • South North Island, –
  • North South Island, –
  • Central South Island, Gillian Dibley
  • Otago, Catherine Wilkinson
  • Southland, Joy Brown
2003/04 Wendy Eyles, President

Gillian Dibley, Vice-President

Michelle Mann, Secretary

  • , Treasurer

Verity Lockley, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, –

Publications, –

Funding Officer, –

Resources, Gladys Billing

Register, Leigh Kenney

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Website, –

Research, –

TripletsPlus, Jacqueline Samaratanga

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, –
  • West Central North Island, –
  • East Central North Island, –
  • East Coast North Island, Hawkes Bay Club
  • South North Island, –
  • North South Island, Winnie Earl
  • Central South Island, Vicky Abbott
  • Otago, Catherine Wilkinson
  • Southland, Joy Brown
2004/05 Wendy Eyles, President

Stephanie Gartrell, Vice-President

Michelle Mann, Secretary

Yvonne Pou, Treasurer

  • , Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, Wendy Eyles

Publications, –

Funding Officer, Raewyn Alexander

Resources, Gladys Billing

Register, Leigh Kenney

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Website, –

Research, –

TripletsPlus, Jacqueline Samaratanga

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Susan Zwalue
  • West Central North Island, Fiona Stokes-Rouse
  • East Central North Island, –
  • East Coast North Island, Robyn Boswell
  • South North Island, Jonnece McLachlan
  • North South Island, Marie Gardyne
  • Central South Island, Leanne Pascoe
  • Otago, Catherine Wilkinson
  • Southland, Joy Brown
2005/06 Michelle Mann, President

  • , Vice-President

Pip Eagle, Secretary

Margaret Fromont, Treasurer

  • , Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, Wendy Eyles

Publications, –

Funding Officer, Margaret Fromont

Resources, Tracy McGee

Register, Leigh Kenney

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Website, –

Research, –

TripletsPlus, Jacqueline Samaratanga

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, –
  • West Central North Island, Fiona Stokes-Rouse
  • Central North Island, Robyn Boswell
  • East Coast North Island, –
  • South North Island, Fiona McGlinchey
  • North South Island, Monica Burrows
  • Central South Island, Vanessa Borham
  • Otago, Kyleen Brook
  • Southland, Joy Brown
2006/07 Michelle Mann, President

Mel Cade, Vice-President

Pip Eagle, Secretary

Margaret Fromont, Treasurer

Tracy McGee, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, Kim Prattley

Publications, –

Funding Officer, Margaret Fromont

Resources, Tracy McGee

Register, Leigh Kenney

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Website, –

Research, –

TripletsPlus, Jacqueline Samaratanga

Regional Liaison Officers:

  • North Island, Marlie Simpson
  • West Central North Island, Fiona Stokes-Rouse
  • Central North Island, –
  • East Coast North Island, –

South North Island, Fiona McGlinchey

North South Island, Leonie Starkey

Central South Island, Vanessa Borham

Otago, Fiona Cowles

Southland, Joy Brown

2007/08 Melanie Cade, President

Tracey McGee, Vice-President

Jackie Taylor, Secretary

Margaret Fromont, Treasurer

Kim Prattley, Newsletter

Regional Liaison Officers: Disbanded this year

2008/09 Melanie Cade, President

Fiona Purchas, Vice-President

Sarah Baylis, Secretary

Tracy McGee, Treasurer

Tracy McGee, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, –

Publications, –

Funding Officer, Sarah Baylis

Resources, Tracy McGee

Register, Leigh Kenney

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Research, –

TripletsPlus, Jacqueline Samaratanga

2009/10 Sarah Baylis, President

Melanie Cade, Immediate Past President

Fiona Purchas, Vice-President

Ellie Chapman/Marlie Walker, Secretary

Tracey McGee, Treasurer

Tracey McGee, Overseas Liaison

Newsletter, Terri-Lynn Mitchell

Publications, –

Funding Officer, Sarah Baylis

Resources, Tracey McGee

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Research, –

TripletsPlus, Jacqueline Samaratanga

Regional Liaison Officers: Disbanded this year

2010/11 Sarah Baylis, President

Fiona Purchas, Vice-President

Ellie Chapman, Secretary

Tracey McGee, Treasurer

Newsletter, Terri-Lynn Mitchell

Publications, –

Grants Officer, Carol Coley

Resources, Christine Charleston

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Research, –

Triplets Plus, Jacqueline Samaratanga

Regional Liaison Officers: Disbanded this year

Archivist/Overseas Liaison – Disbanded

2011/12 Fiona Purchas, President

Sarah Baylis, Immediate Past President

Carolyn Lister, Vice-President

Ellie Mackwood, Secretary

Tracey McGee, Treasurer

Terri-Lynn Mitchell, Newsletter

Resources, Christine Charleston

Grants and Funding, Carol Coley

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Triplets Plus, Stacey Morunga & Carol Coley

0800 Operator, Jessica Zame, Roz Irwn, Fiona Purchas, Jacqui Newell

2012/13 Fiona Purchas, President

Carolyn Lister, Vice-President

Beate Noldan, Secretary

Roz Irwin, Treasurer

Ainslee Jacobson, Marketing

Terri-Lynn Mitchell, Newsletter

Ellie Mackwood, IT Coordinator

Resources,

Grants and Funding, Carol Coley

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Triplets Plus, Stacey Morunga & Carol Coley

0800 Operator, Jessica Zame, Roz Irwn, Fiona Purchas, Jacqui Newell

2013/14 Carolyn Lister, President
Fiona Purchas, Immediate Past PresidentAinslee Jacobson, Vice-PresidentBeate Noldan, SecretaryRoz Irwin, TreasurerTracey Warren, MarketingTerri-Lynn Mitchell, Magazine

Ellie Mackwood, IT Coordinator

Resources, Carol Coley

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Triplets Plus, Stacey Morunga & Carol Coley

Grants, Eloise Sime

0800 Operator, Jessica Zame, Roz Irwn, Fiona Purchas, Jacqui Newell

2014/15 Carolyn Lister, President

Ainslee Jacobson, Vice-President

Beate Noldan, Secretary

Roz Irwin, Treasurer

Kirsten Kyle, Marketing

Terri-Lynn Mitchell, Magazine

Ellie Mackwood, IT Coordinator

Resources, Carol Coley

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Raewyn Alexander

Triplets Plus, Stacey Morunga & Carol Coley

Grants, Eloise Sime

0800 Operator, Jessica Zame, Roz Irwn, Fiona Purchas, Jacqui Newell

2015/16 Carolyn Lister, President

Ainslee Jacobson, Vice-President

Beate Noldan, Secretary

Vicki Fiet, Treasurer

Shelley King, Marketing

Terri-Lynn Mitchell, Magazine

Lauren Manson, Website

Resources, Jane Rumyantseva

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Dee Harrs

Triplets Plus, Stacey Morunga

0800 Operator, Jessica Zame, Roz Irwn, Fiona Purchas, Jacqui Newell

2016/17 Ainslee Jacobson, President

Carolyn Lister, Immediate Past President

Beate Noldan, Vice-President

Rebecca Grooby, Secretary

Vicki Fiet, Treasurer

Michelle Kitney, Marketing

Shelley King, Magazine

Lauren Manson, Website

Resources, Jane Rumyantseva

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Dee Harrs

Triplets Plus, Stacey Morunga

International, Carolyn Lister

0800 Operator, Jessica Zame, Fiona Purchas, Jacqui Newell

2017/18 Ainslee Jacobson, President

Beate Noldan, Vice-President

Bron Dutton, Secretary

Vicki Fiet, Treasurer

Michelle Kitney, Marketing

Kirsty Saxon, Magazine

Heather Ben, Website

Resources, Jane Rumyantseva

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Desiree Morgan

Triplets Plus, Stacey Morunga

International, Carolyn Lister

0800 Operator, Jessica Zame, Jacqui

2018/19 Ainslee Jacobson, President

Beate Noldan, Vice-President

Bron Dutton, Secretary

Heather Ben, Treasurer

Michelle Kitney, Marketing

Kirsty Saxon, Magazine

Lizelle Lombaard, Website

Resources, Jane Rumyantseva

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Desiree Morgan

Triplets Plus, Stacey Morunga

International, Carolyn Lister

0800 Operator, Jessica Zame, Jacqui Newell

2019/20 Heather Ben, President

Ainslee Jacobson, Immediate Past President

Michelle Kitney, Vice-President

Bron Dutton, Secretary

Sally Coombs, Treasurer

Amy Dean, Marketing

Magazine, Kirsty Saxon

Resources,

Register, Joy Brown

Special Needs Coordinator, Desiree Morgan

Website,

Triplets Plus,

International, Carolyn Lister

0800 Operator, Jessica Zame, Jacqui Newell

 

Multiples NZ Volunteer Awards 2020 Winners Announced!

The purpose of the 7th Multiples NZ Volunteer Awards is to highlight the volunteer effort required to support families with multiples in New Zealand. The Awards recognise individual achievement, while publicly acknowledging all voluntary effort. These awards are an opportunity for members, clubs and Multiples NZ to publicly express thanks to our hard working and committed volunteers!

Congratulations to everyone who was nominated and thank you to all those who submitted nominations this year. The winners are listed below:

EMERGING VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR 2020

Awarded to a volunteer who has stepped up and made a difference in their club or the New Zealand multiples community in their first 18 months as a volunteer (either on a committee or in a specific volunteer role e.g. starting a sub-branch, running a playgroup, being a contact person). The award highlights not only their contribution thus far, but their potential/intention to contribute to the multiple’s community in the future. 

The volunteer must be a financial member of a Multiples NZ affiliated club or Multiples NZ.

Prize includes $50 cash and $100 to the winner’s local Multiples NZ affiliated club.

Joint Winners for 2020:

SUPPORT PERSON OF THE YEAR 2020

Awarded to a volunteer who has provided exceptional service by supporting a family or families with multiples in the past year. 

The volunteer must be a financial member of a Multiples NZ affiliated club or Multiples NZ

Prize includes $50 cash and $100 to the winners local Multiples NZ affiliated club.

Winner for 2020:

VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR 2020

This year the nominees of the Volunteer of the Year award will be made up of the award winners of the Volunteer of the Month Award. All monthly winners from September of the previous year through to the month of August will be considered as nominees for the Volunteer of the Year award. For 2020 winners of the Volunteer of the Month Award from March 2020 to August 2020 will be eligible for this award.

The Volunteer of the Year is awarded to a volunteer who has provided exceptional service for the betterment of families with multiples within their local area or nationally. 

The volunteer must be a financial member of a Multiples NZ affiliated club or Multiples NZ

Prize includes $50 cash and $100 to the winner’s local Multiples NZ affiliated club.

Winner for 2020

COMMUNITY DEDICATION 2020

Awarded to a volunteer who has made an outstanding contribution to their club or the New Zealand multiples community for at least five years regardless of their role – from committee members to those people helping behind the scenes. 

Prize includes $50 cash and $100 to the winner’s local Multiples NZ affiliated club.

Winner for 2020

CLUB OF THE YEAR 2020

Awarded to a Multiples NZ affiliated club that encompasses all or some of the following attributes:

  • Has built and/or maintains a strong sense of belonging in its members.
  • There has been significant membership growth and retention of members.
  • Develops and implements innovative projects that support the needs of multiple families
  • Is governed by a committee that acts in the best interests of its member families, understands its responsibilities and has systems in place to exercise them properly.
  • Shows a willingness to share ideas and experiences at a national level.
  • Grows and maintains positive relationships with the wider community, support agencies and national sponsors.
  • Recovered after facing significant challenges such as dwindling membership, lack of committee or finances.

$300 cash prize

Winner for 2020


Congratulations again to all our winners and all those nominated!


Multiples NZ Volunteer Awards 2020

The winners of these awards will be announced virtually this year from 8pm on the 5th of October via Facebook Live on the Multiples NZ Facebook page.

Congratulations to everyone who has been nominated and thank you to all those who submitted a nomination.

EMERGING VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR 2020

Awarded to a volunteer who has stepped up and made a difference in their club or the New Zealand multiples community in their first 18 months as a volunteer (either on a committee or in a specific volunteer role e.g. starting a sub-branch, running a playgroup, being a contact person). The award highlights not only their contribution thus far, but their potential/intention to contribute to the multiple’s community in the future. 

The volunteer must be a financial member of a Multiples NZ affiliated club or Multiples NZ.

Prize includes $50 cash and $100 to the winner’s local Multiples NZ affiliated club.

Nominees 2020

Anna Havrankova – Multiples Auckland North

Christine Pugh – Wellington Multiples

Ella Garnham – KāpiMana Multiples

Heather Craig – Multiples Canterbury

Jo Otukolo – Multiples Auckland NorthMalama Caskie Multiples Auckland North

SUPPORT PERSON OF THE YEAR 2020

Awarded to a volunteer who has provided exceptional service by supporting a family or families with multiples in the past year. 

The volunteer must be a financial member of a Multiples NZ affiliated club or Multiples NZ

Prize includes $50 cash and $100 to the winners local Multiples NZ affiliated club.

Nominees 2020

Abby Harding – Multiples Canterbury

Amy Teague – Wellington Multiples

Emma Bentley – KāpiMana Multiples

Lynley Stringer – Multiples Auckland North

VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR 2020

This year the nominees of the Volunteer of the Year award will be made up of the award winners of the Volunteer of the Month Award. All monthly winners from September of the previous year through to the month of August will be considered as nominees for the Volunteer of the Year award. For 2020 winners of the Volunteer of the Month Award from March 2020 to August 2020 will be eligible for this award.

The Volunteer of the Year is awarded to a volunteer who has provided exceptional service for the betterment of families with multiples within their local area or nationally. 

The volunteer must be a financial member of a Multiples NZ affiliated club or Multiples NZ

Prize includes $50 cash and $100 to the winner’s local Multiples NZ affiliated club.

Nominees 2020

Desiree Morgan – Multiples Counties Manukau

Georgie Manning – Wellington Multiples 

Helen Johnson – Multiples Canterbury

Jane Dempsey – Multiples Auckland Central

Lucie Brooks – Multiples Bay of Plenty

Tori Pinfold – KāpiMana Multiples

COMMUNITY DEDICATION 2020

Awarded to a volunteer who has made an outstanding contribution to their club or the New Zealand multiples community for at least five years regardless of their role – from committee members to those people helping behind the scenes. 

Prize includes $50 cash and $100 to the winner’s local Multiples NZ affiliated club.

Nominees 2020

Kirsty Saxon – Multiples Canterbury

Rachel Smith – Multiples Canterbury

CLUB OF THE YEAR 2020

Awarded to a Multiples NZ affiliated club that encompasses all or some of the following attributes:

  • Has built and/or maintains a strong sense of belonging in its members.
  • There has been significant membership growth and retention of members.
  • Develops and implements innovative projects that support the needs of multiple families
  • Is governed by a committee that acts in the best interests of its member families, understands its responsibilities and has systems in place to exercise them properly.
  • Shows a willingness to share ideas and experiences at a national level.
  • Grows and maintains positive relationships with the wider community, support agencies and national sponsors.
  • Recovered after facing significant challenges such as dwindling membership, lack of committee or finances.

$300 cash prize

Nominees 2020

KāpiMana Multiples

Multiples Canterbury

Multiples Counties Manukau

Wellington Multiples



Mātauranga Māori in pregnancy and birth

Kirsty Saxon (Multiples New Zealand) talks to our multiple mamas about the resurgence of mātauranga Māori in pregnancy and birth.

The word whānau means both to give birth and family, and hapū means both pregnant and clan, illustrating the significance of pregnancy and childbirth to Māori. The whakataukī (proverb) ‘Mate i te tamaiti he aurukōwhao; mate i te wahine he takerehāia’ (the death of a child may be overcome, but the death of a woman is a calamity) shows the importance of producing children. When a family line was in danger of disappearing through lack of children it was called a whare ngaro (lost house).

Amy Black (Multiples Tauranga) is one of an increasing number of multiple mothers who are using mātauranga Māori practices with their babies.  Mum to almost two  year old girls, Bethany and Millie, Amy was gifted wahakura by her iwi, Ngāi Tahu.  Ngāi Tahu gift wahakura to all new babies registered with the iwi.  Amy saying, “We were so grateful to receive them and they were exceptionally handy to have so we could take their beds with us wherever we went. I love how flax is a natural product for my babies to sleep in and they smelt really good too… and best of all we have them as a gorgeous keepsake to keep in the family for the future!”

A wahakura is a woven sleeping bassinet for a baby up to six months of age, based on a traditional design, which has been revived for modern use by Māori doctor David Tipene-Leach. A wahakura is made using the traditional art of raranga (weaving). Māori parents can maintain the cultural tradition of keeping their babies with them in bed, but provide a protected space for a baby. Sleeping in the same bed as young babies puts them at greater risk of SUDI (Sudden Unexplained Death of an Infant).   It also promotes breast-feeding and bonding with baby.

Another mātauranga practise Amy has embraced, is burying her babies placentas.  The word for the placenta, ‘whenua’, is also the word for land. The placenta is the organ that nourishes and protects your baby in the uterus and is considered sacred by many.  The umbilical cord close to a baby’s body is the pito. The whenua was taken after birth and buried on ancestral whenua, which linked the baby with their tribal land. It is now acknowledged that the placenta is considered precious by many, and is to be respected. Traditional Māori practice is to bury the placenta and return it to the land. This is because the earth mother, Papatūānuku, birthed all living things and the land is her placenta or whenua. When we bury the whenua we return it to its place of birth. The Māori of New Zealand are Tangata Whenua, people of the land and so the word whenua means placenta, but also land.  Amy’s mother buried her whenua under fruit and nut trees at her home.  “Whatungarongaro te tangata toitū te whenua” – As man disappears from sight, the land remains. — Māori proverb.

Amy Walsh, Multiples Hamilton, is pregnant with her twins and has purchased muka ties for their umbilical cords.   “I went to the Hapū Wānanga Antenatal class and Kelly who runs it sells the muka ties. I had already heard from several people about them. I was instantly interested as I never liked the plastic clips with my older children, but wasn’t aware back then of any other options.”

Muka, a flax fibre with anti-bacterial properties has been used by Māori families for centuries to tie the umbilical cord, instead of medical clamps.  Mirielle de Ridder, from Kerikeri, is making pure cotton cord ties.  “Fifteen years ago we moved to the South Island and saw the beauty of pounamu, and our connection was instant. Thus our journey began with the sacred kōhatu.  We connect, listen and learn with every stone, and follow the path she takes us on.  To be able to help connect baby and their journey earthside to Aotearoa by using pounamu to create cord ties and pito cutters, we believe we are truly blessed.”  de Ridder’s pito cutters are specially crafted with a knife edge blade for cutting the umbilical cord, and are a great natural alternative. After the pito has been used they can be then sent back to have the knife edge taken off and fashioned into a wearable toki to be treasured for generations.  They are crafted from pounamu which is the stone of good luck and love.

Other Matauranga Māori practises which continue to be used are mirimiri (massage), karakia (prayer), and waiata (song) during pregnancy and birth, and beyond.

Whakawhanau pēpi

Other Matauranga Māori practises which continue to be used are mirimiri (massage), karakia (prayer), and waiata (song) during pregnancy and birth, and beyond.

Maakarita Paku  is a Consumer Reviewer for the New Zealand College of Midwives.  She has seen a rise in Māori whanau implementing Mātauranga Māori into the birth of their babies, she propses that this increase is linked to the Kohanga Reo movement. She says there is a generation of Kohanga Reo kids who are now parents, and many of them have been exposed to mātauranga Māori and traditional birthing practices.

Te Whare Tapa Wha

Kirsty Saxon (Multiples Canterbury/Multiples NZ Executive) explores mental health from a Māori perspective.

The topic of mental health is something I am really passionate about, as a mum who suffered from Postnatal Depression (PND) with both my singleton in 2011, and my twinkles in 2013/2014; and also someone who still struggles with depression.  Mothers of multiples are at a higher risk of experiencing PND – approximately 1 in 5 mothers of twins and triplets are diagnosed by their health professional as suffering from (PND). A further 1 in 5 mothers think they may have had PND, but do not receive medical confirmation or treatment. (Dr. Erika Fraser, TAMBA, 2010).  When I was reflecting on these statistics, I decided to explore this topic from a Māori perspective.  This Māori philosophy is based on a holistic health and wellness model called Te Whare Tapa Whā, developed by Dr Mason Durie in 1984.  Mason Durie KNZM is a New Zealand professor of Māori Studies and research academic at Massey University (psychiatry). He is known for his contributions to Māori health.  Durie is currently Emeritus Professor of Māori Research & Development at Massey University.

Te Whare Tapa Whā can be applied to any health issue, whether it involves physical or psychological  well-being (wairua and whānau). Wairua is also linked to connection via mother and child through the whenua (body) and birth (karanga, sacred lifting of tapu and replacing with noa). This is what makes it holistic opposed to westernised version of wellbeing such as the biomedical model.  The biomedical model of health focuses on purely biological factors and excludes psychological, environmental, and social influences. It is considered to be the leading modern way for health care professionals to diagnose and treat a condition in most Western countries.  This might be an interesting lens to look through for PND.

Te Whare Tapa Whā

The model is underpinned by four dimensions representing the basic beliefs of life – te taha hinengaro (psychological health); te taha wairua (spiritual health); te taha tinana (physical health); and te taha whānau (family health). These four dimensions are represented by the four walls of a house. Each wall is necessary to the strength and symmetry of the building.  Connection with the whenua/land and roots forms the foundation.  All of these kaupapa are interrelated, as when one becomes “sick” or “unstable” the others are affected too.  To me, this holistic approach of ensuring all four dimensions are strong in order to create a strong parent and whanau are a valuable tool in our kete when creating happy and healthy families.

Te taha hinengaro (psychological health)

This refers to psychological health, with a focus on emotions. It is understood that the mind and body are inseparable, and that communication through emotions is important and more meaningful than the exchange of words. Taking care of taha hinengaro is important for everyone, regardless of whether or not you’ve experienced mental illness or distress.  When your taha hinengaro is strong, you can better cope with the ups and downs of life. You can express your feelings and reach out for support from friends, whānau and hoamahi/colleagues if you need to.  The kupu in te reo Māori is Whakawhanuangatanga – to build relationships, relate well socially, and communicate.  Some things you can do in this area could be spending quality time and talking with whānau, friends, workmates and neighbours,  connecting with support groups or programmes, volunteering your time, or getting outside for exercise and reflection.  Reinforce that there is strength in asking for help.  With new mums, they may not admit it themselves, but do your best as a family member or friend to assess the situation, is this new mama/whanau coping?  How can her village wrap it’s support so tightly around her she will never be let down?  

Te taha wairua (spiritual health)

This refers to spiritual awareness,  including when considering the spiritual attachment between mother and baby. It is recognised as the essential requirement for health and well-being. It is believed that without spiritual awareness, an individual can be lacking in well-being and therefore more prone to ill health. Wairua explores relationships with the environment, people and heritage. Feeling comfortable in your identity, values and beliefs helps you feel secure in who you are and what you stand for. When you are content with yourself it is easier to cope with challenges, build strong whānau relationships and discover the things that uplift you.  Connect with your special places/tūrangawaewae (place of belonging) or a place that recharges you, Find a spiritual practice you can become completely absorbed in, such as meditation, investigate your heritage/whakapapa, who you are, where you are from and where you stand; skilfully reflecting on the past can enhance our appreciation of the present moment.  But how do parents of multiples find time for self and spiritual care?  Charles Buxton said, “You will never find time for anything. If you want time you must make it.”  Be intentional about your spiritual goals, write them down, find a moment which is yours alone.

Te taha tinana

This refers to physical health and growth and development as it relates to the body. This focuses on physical well-being and bodily care. Tinana suffers when a person is under emotional stress, or is unwell. Pain in different parts of your body is tinana communicating what is going on consciously or unconsciously. Trying to nourish and strengthen your physical wellbeing will help you to cope with the ups and downs of life, this can include nourishing your body with food as medicine and rongoā Māori (natural remedy, traditional treatment, Māori medicine). Feeling physically well helps us to feel mentally well. Having strong taha tinana means we can be there for our whānau and take leadership in helping our loved ones live longer, healthier lives too.  It’s important to acknowledge that sometimes your taha tinana may not be as good as you’d like it to be, and this might be beyond your control. What’s important is that you take care of your taha tinana and do what you can to nurture it, regardless of your current physical abilities. Make a commitment with your whānau to make healthier choices together, get involved in a sports group or club, be aware of what triggers less healthy behaviour – for me this is eating when I’m stressed, get out there and be adventurous – physical activity helps prevent or manage a lot of health conditions.  Exercise, if you love or hate it, you can not deny that it does something awesome for your body and mind. It releases endorphins and makes you feel better. So whatever you love doing, do that. For me, it is dog walking with friends (walk and whinge) and crossfit.  Get what you love in your schedule.  

Te taha whānau

This is the most fundamental unit of Te Ao Māori . Whānau may include up to three or four generations, and its importance will vary from one individual to the next. The beliefs, expectations or opinions of the whānau can have a major impact on the career and personal choices that an individual makes.  They can also be used as a strength, to allow mama to rest or to share their parenting tips. Traditionally this is what the Kuia and Kaumātua roles were within the hapū. Mothers went gathering, fathers went hunting and Nanny and Papa taught and nurtured the mokopuna.  Often hard to translate into today’s society as our whānau structures have changed and adapted to a more western version of family.  Spending time with whānau, doing things for them and getting involved gives you a feeling of purpose, connection and wellbeing. It benefits you and builds the strength of your whole whānau. As a core source of strength, support, security and identity, whānau plays a central role in your wellbeing.  To nurture your family, spend time with your kids, make time for your friends and wider family, get outdoors – go for a walk, have a picnic.    Treasure our extended and elderly whānau … invite them for meals; help with their laundry, cleaning or dishes; or take their kids for a walk while mum has a decent shower. 

The wharenui (meeting house)

This is the symbol used to illustrate these dimensions of well-being. Just as each corner of the house must be strong and balanced to hold its structure, each dimension of well-being must be balanced  for health to exist. Developing self-awareness is key to creating balance and harmony in all aspects of life.  All four walls are needed, and must be in balance, for the house to be strong. So taking care of your physical health is important, but to live your best possible life, you also need to pay attention to your mental health, spirituality and the strength of your whānau.  The good news is there are lots of everyday things you can do to build health in these four areas. You’re probably doing a lot of them already – it’s just a case of recognising their value and making them a priority.

Whenua

Whenua is the place where you stand. It is your connection to the land – a source of life, nourishment and wellbeing for everyone.  Whenua includes soil, rocks, plants, animals and people – the tangata whenua. We are linked physically and spiritually to the land – it is the earth through which you are connected to your tūpuna/ancestors and all the generations that will come after you.  You can also think about whenua as your place of belonging – that means the spaces where you feel comfortable, safe and able to be yourself. It could be around your friends, at home with whānau, as part of a sports team or even at your place of study or mahi/work.   Everything in the Māori world has a life force, the mauri, and when our natural resources are not looked after, this life force is weakened. This has a direct impact on mental health and wellbeing.  Get your whānau together and explore your local maunga/mountain; challenge yourself to produce less waste. It’s amazing to see how much we use each day that isn’t necessary! There are plenty of tips online for how you can reduce, reuse and recycle; or plant trees or a vegetable garden.

Reflection

On a personal level, I still struggle through some days, but they are few and far between now.  What helped was purely time … time with my children, time with myself, and just taking one day at a time.    My parenting journey has been one of definitive highs and lows, but through it all I have learned to take each moment, hour, day, as it comes, and know that things will eventually get better;  to enjoy the little things, as one day you will look back and realise these are the big things in life; surround yourself with people who will love, support, listen, laugh and cry with you; and most importantly of all – everything happens for a reason.  It is never apparent at the time, but there are lessons there eventually. When one door closes, another opens.  As a parent of multiples, it is a delicate balance, finding the time to make sure I am nurturing Te Whare Tapa Whā.  But it is something I am becoming more mindful of as the years go by.

“He ōranga ngākau, he pikinga waiora”

 Positive feelings in your heart will enhance your sense of self-worth. 

This whakataukī refers to emotional, spiritual and family waiora dimensions of an individual. Expanding on this, an individual’s waiora is maintained by a balance between all four wellbeing dimensions and this whakataukī draws on being positive.

Kirsty is mum to Ruby (8), Xavier (5) and Lilian (5).  Their whānau have recently moved from 90 Mile Beach in the Far North, to Methven in Canterbury.

References:

Māorimenshealth.co.nz

Mason Durie, 1984

MHAW.nz

R2R.org.nz

Tamba.org.uk 

Stacey Ruru, Maree Roche, Waikaremoana Waitoki; Journal of Indigenous Wellbeing, June 2017 

Special thanks also to Hermione John